Holy Week & Easter 2017


By Barry Parker, Rector
Listen Online

Posted on April 9, 2017

Dear Friends;

The paradox of our time in history is that we spend more, but have less; we buy more, but enjoy it less. We have bigger houses and smaller families; more conveniences, but less time; more medicine, but less wellness. We read too little, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom. We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. These are the times of tall men, and short character; steep profits and shallow relationships. These are the days of two incomes, but more divorce; of fancier houses, but broken homes. We’ve learned how to make a living, but not a life; we’ve added years to life, not life to years; we’ve cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul.

In looking through some old files recently, I stumbled across this haunting commentary on the world at the turn of the last millennium. It was provocatively titled, “Wanting More in an Age of Plenty: Our Wallets are Fat, but our Souls are Empty.” (David G. Myers in Christianity Today, April 24, 2000.) What struck me seventeen years later is that the themes of this article feel amplified today. With the “noise” we currently live with—the more things change, the more they stay the same.

What is exciting about celebrating Easter—the Day of the Resurrection—is that all the frustrations expressed in the above quote are overturned, defeated, made new. Even though we think we know what happens, many of us do not take the time to experience the reality of the Resurrection. The tomb is empty, Jesus is alive, God wins!

I am so glad you have decided to be a part of our Celebrations this Easter 2017. It is more than glorious worship, great music and profound prayers. You are invited to the ground zero of the history and heart of humanity being re-created and made new. It is only when we experience this new reality can we say,

I heard a voice thunder from the Throne: “Look! Look! God has moved into the neighbourhood, making his home with men and women! They’re his people, he’s their God. He’ll wipe every tear from their eyes. Death is gone for good—tears gone, crying gone, pain gone—all the first order of things gone.” The Enthroned continued, “Look! I’m making everything new. Write it all down—each word dependable and accurate.” Then he said, “It’s happened. I’m A to Z. I’m the Beginning, I’m the Conclusion. From Water-of-Life Well I give freely to the thirsty. Conquerors inherit all this. I’ll be God to them, they’ll be sons and daughters to me. (Rev. 21:3-7, Msg)

Thank you for joining us this Easter Day to experience the God who is still in the dead-raising business!

In Wonder,

(The Rev. Canon Dr.) Barry Parker, Rector